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“I have literally not taken off this jacket in weeks,” the 28-year-old Robert Pattinson told us when we interviewed him for his latest movie, “The Rover.”

Wearing a simple blue jacket, shirt and pants, the “Twilight” superstar explained that somebody stole his clothes. “It doesn’t make any sense to me,” he said. “Did you ever see that episode of ‘South Park’ about these underpants gnomes that steal your underpants? I think I got it. So I just started wearing the same thing pretty much every day, like a uniform.”

He admitted that he has no idea where his clothes are. “I’m sure they’re in some kind of random storage box somewhere… I know that is totally ridiculous but I couldn’t find any of them.”

Since he has been making movies in diverse locations since “Twilight,” the British actor revealed that he calls LA home – at least, for now.

Curiously, however, Robert informed us that he sold his house in LA “I suddenly realized I am not quite old enough to be dealing with the plumbing and stuff.”

We asked him if he’s homeless and he said, “I am not quite. I spend about six months borrowing other people’s houses, which were nice.”

It’s been two years after all the insanity and craziness of “Twilight” and Robert shared, “It feels like it’s longer, to be honest… it’s all just been a gradual progression. I think, as you get older, like every movie you do you get a little bit more confident…”

He added, “I’m curious how people receive the new stuff I’m doing because it’s kind of, you know, I do quite abstract films. So I am curious how people who like ‘Twilight’ will come to see things like ‘The Rover.’ Hopefully, they’ll enjoy it.”

Asked whether it became a nice escape for him to be filming “Rover” in Australia without “Twilight” fans wandering around, Robert replied, “It was definitely a really nice escape… I loved it because not only were there no people trying to find you, there’s no one at all. So it’s just much easier to concentrate. So I found it incredibly peaceful and relaxing.”
Guy Pearce, The Rover

Robert is also appearing in “Maps To The Stars.” He explained his role in the said movie, “My role (in it) is a kind of cipher for Bruce Wagner who wrote it and because he used to be a limo driver in LA. He wrote a lot of stuff and got many of his ideas from that so he is the one vaguely normal person in ‘Maps to the Stars’ but he’s kind of a little bit opportunistic. He is a wannabe actor and writer but probably not that talented. He’s like a hustler in LA.”

On choosing roles, Robert said, “50 percent is about being able to work with directors I admire. I think about that a lot but I find it more comfortable to do small roles if I am choosing something for its director. But if you are doing a lead, I try to do something, which I think will precipitate into my normal life.

“I want to do something which I feel (is) totally impossible for me to do. I think it will make me a bigger person in my real life afterwards. I kind of try to do that.”

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posted by Jun 22, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Press, Television, Twilight, Videos

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posted by Jun 21, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Press, The Rover, Twilight

I’m at a bar drinking with Robert Pattinson. You know, he’s famous – he was Edward the vampire in Twilight. After a few hours together we’re practically good mates – except something has come between us. It’s a large body of mass called Dean.

Dean is Rob’s bodyguard and where Rob goes, so does Dean. Seriously, it’s like President Obama is turning up. Dean comes in first, checks the exits, liaises with the bar’s security and then finally gives the OK for Rob to enter. And Dean doesn’t sit down. He’s an ex-marine and he’s always standing, scoping and assessing the risk factors of the situation. And it seems I’m the number one suspect. Maybe he thinks I’m a werewolf, ’cause if you know anything about Twilight you know the vampires and the werewolves don’t really get along.

And sure, I possibly don’t belong at this party. It’s full of Australia’s acting elite. There’s Guy Pearce chatting to Anthony Hayes, there’s Dan Wyllie having beers with Bryan Brown and then there’s me. More than one person asks me, “You look familiar – what did you do on this movie?” “Ahhh, silent partner in the catering” was all I could come up with. After a few drinks I did add that I was in the movie The Nugget.

In a way I feel sorry Rob, or RPatz as his fans know him. He’s probably never seen The Nugget. No, he’s a genuine teen idol, the likes of whom we haven’t seen since Johnny Depp or Leonardo DiCaprio. How did he know this small movie about a vampire who falls in love with a mere mortal would be such a phenomenon? He captured the hearts of millions of teenage girls and their mothers. And because of his real-life romance with Kristen Stewart, the actress who played the romantic interest, the press went into overdrive. It was the perfect storm: a cult book that turned into a massive film with two young stars who were in love with each other on screen and off. It also marked the start of the social media frenzy, with Twitter just starting to have an impact. Sightings of RPatz and KStew were tweeted and the fans turned up alongside the paparazzi. I expect this is when Dean entered the picture. When going to the shops becomes a problem, you need a big bloke to step in. He’d probably be handy carrying the shopping too. Who knows, maybe he’s a bit like Alfred the butler from Batman – an all-round handy guy. Do they learn how to cook in the marines?

So, five movies later, Rob is trying to shake that Twilight tag, and part of that process is appearing in David Michod’s new film The Rover. And Rob, my good mate, is very good in it. He does a great double act with Guy Pearce and plays a convincing simple boy from America’s deep south. I tell Rob this and let him know that he should do a comedy. “I reckon every movie I do is a comedy,” he replies. Touché. So, he did watch the last Twilight installment.

I sense Dean, head of RPatz security, has sensed me, so I try and talk to him. After all my dad was a marine. OK, he was a mechanic in the air force, but it’s a similar uniform. Dean gives me nothing. Would you like a drink? No answer. I ask him if it’s fun travelling around the world? No answer. Well, I suppose this beats telling kids to stop throwing pickles on the ceiling at McDonalds on a Saturday night? No laugh, no smile, just a slight twitch of the face. I mean, I understand Dean has seen some bad things in his time – middle-aged German women stalking Rob around the globe, paparazzi relentlessly pursuing this guy for a photo of his latest romance and as a marine, maybe some worse stuff in the Gulf war.

And then Rob lights a cigarette inside the bar. Yeah, this is old-school Hollywood style, something Jack Nicholson would do. Who cares about the rules? Dean swings into action, whisking his young movie star from the bar. It’s a precise military action; it was like he was never there. I started to wonder why this happened, then I realised. Rob was giving Dean a sign. It was the “Get me out of here” signal. I realise this because it was just after I pulled out my Twilight board game and asked Rob to sign it. It wasn’t for me of course, it was for my little friend called eBay. Oh well, if anyone wants an unsigned Twilight board game, I’ve got one. And go and see The Rover, it’s very good, mainly ’cause my mate’s in it.

You can follow Dave O’Neil on Twitter @itsdaveoneil. RPatz is not on Twitter but Dave will pass all messages on.

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He has millions of female fans, he lives in Los Angeles and paparazzi dog his footsteps wherever he goes; yet it would be difficult to find a young man less interested in embracing his stardom than Robert Pattinson. The 28-year-old actor refuses to go the Hollywood route of big houses, wardrobes full of designer clothes and roles that utilise his boyish good looks.

He has even rejected the idea of taking the near-obligatory therapy route followed by nearly every self-absorbed star in Hollywood, although he jokes: “I would love to go into therapy but it makes me too anxious.”

Then, more seriously, he adds: “I’ve been talking to a lot of people about it and I don’t know. I kind of like my anxiety in a funny sort of way and I like my peaks and troughs. Luckily depression never lasts long with me.”

We are talking in a Beverly Hills hotel suite about his new filmThe Rover, set in a post-apocalyptic Australian wasteland, in which he is totally unrecognisable as Ray, a twitchy, dirt-caked, slow-witted lost soul with rotting teeth. He joins forces with Eric (Guy Pearce), a man of few words who is on the trail of a gang of thieves who stole his only possession, his car. Ray is a role as far removed from the handsome Edward Cullen in the Twilight movies as Pattinson could get – which suits him fine.

For three years, Pattinson lived virtually non-stop with the adventures of the brooding vampire and his romance with the mortal schoolgirl Bella, played by Kristen Stewart. It was the role that, whether he likes it or not, made him one of the hottest and most in-demand young actors in the world. He caused an army of female fans to leave their families and homes to follow him to wherever he was filming.

“I had a bit of a struggle at first because my life really contracted and I couldn’t do a lot of the stuff I used to be able to do,” he admits. “But once I got through that a year or two ago I just accepted my life is something else and now I can’t really remember what it was like before, So it’s much easier to deal with.

“It seems much longer ago than two years since the last Twilight came out and I think as you get older you get a bit more confident with every movie you do, so it’s been a gradual graduation to this.”

Pattinson’s “graduation” has included a romantic melodrama (Remember Me), a period circus piece (Water for Elephants), a tale of the French nobility (Bel Ami) and playing an introspective Wall Street tycoon (Cosmopolis). He will soon be seen as T.E. Lawrence in the yet-to-be-released Nicole Kidman film Queen of the Desert and he is a wannabe actor and writer in David Cronenberg’s Maps to the Stars which, like The Rover, was well-received at this year’s Cannes Film Festival.

“I’m curious to know whether people who liked the Twilight movies will come and see things like The Rover,” he says. “Hopefully they’ll enjoy it. I try to do ambitious projects but I don’t know if people are going to like them. You just try and do things which are challenging and hopefully people will appreciate that.”

Although his name is regularly linked with big studio projects such as Star Wars and superhero movies (recent rumours had him cast as a young Han Solo in a Star Wars spin-off), he denies he has ever been offered them and is wary about becoming involved in another franchise. “They don’t come into my orbit and I don’t really see myself in a lot of mainstream parts,” he says. “I’ve never been part of the group that gets these roles.”

He particularly enjoyed working on the low-budget apocalyptic thriller The Rover because it was filmed entirely on location in the scorching heat of the Australian outback, where he existed on a diet of “white bread and barbecue sauce”, and where there were no fans or photographers to pester him. “I just loved it because not only was there no one trying to find you, there’s no one there at all. I wasn’t worrying about anyone trying to sneak up on me or anything so I found it incredibly peaceful and relaxing.”

To land the role he had to go through an arduous four-hour audition for writer-director David Michod, whose previous film was the well-reviewed Animal Kingdom. “For the first 45 minutes I had to deal with my own neuroses before I’d do any kind of acting and I think David recognised this and when I let myself calm down I was fine.”

Michod recalls: “We would do a take and Robert would go, ‘Oh I was so terrible.’ But he wasn’t terrible, he’s just very English and very self-deprecating. I knew within five minutes of our four hour audition I’d found the actor to play Ray.”

Pattinson’s global travels keep him away from his home in London, which he isn’t too sorry about. “I spent two months in England last year which is the longest I’ve spent there in six years, which was nice, but I always go back to England at Christmas time and get so depressed that I’m glad to get back to Los Angeles,” he says. “I’ve really grown to like L.A and I guess it’s my home at the moment.”

His current home is other people’s houses. “I had this great house which I bought four or five years ago,” he says. “It was incredible, absolutely completely crazy. It was like Versailles, with an incredible garden, but I just stayed in one room. I sold it because I suddenly realised I’m not quite old enough to be dealing with plumbing and stuff. So I spent about six months borrowing peoples’ houses, which was nice. Now I’m renting a place which is much smaller.”

Pattinson laughs easily and often and is much more relaxed and at ease than in the early days when he resembled a startled deer caught in the headlights. Despite the massive changes in his life in a relatively short time, he has kept his feet firmly on the ground. Although he appears in advertisements for Christian Dior, he is certainly no fashion plate; he lost nearly all his clothes following a recent house move and hasn’t bothered to replace them. “I’ve started wearing the same thing pretty much every day like a uniform,” he says. “I haven’t taken this jacket off for weeks,” indicating the black, slightly moth-eaten jacket he is wearing that nevertheless looks good on him.

“It’s ridiculous. I don’t understand how I don’t have any clothes. I’ve basically stolen every item of clothing that anyone’s ever given me for a premiere but in my closet there are literally about three things. I’m sure there’s some kind of random storage box full of them somewhere.”

Working for Dior, he says with a chuckle, is “the most ridiculous job in the world. I have to do barely anything and I just occasionally have to go to some Dior parties, which is great.”

Pattinson was born in Barnes, West London, and joined the local theatre club as a teenager. He was spotted by a casting agent and made his screen debut in 2004 in a German television production; he was then bizarrely cast as Reese Witherspoon’s son in Vanity Fair, although his scenes ended up on the cutting room floor.

He achieved some recognition for his role as the brave but doomed Cedric Diggory in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and he had a brief flashback cameo in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. He had been torn between an acting career and going to university but the Harry Potter roles convinced him to stick with acting. He played a shell-shocked Second World War airman in a BBC Four production, The Haunted Airman, but then spent the best part of the next two years unemployed. His agent persuaded him to try his luck in Los Angeles so, armed with little but an English accent and a sense of humour, he did.

He was not sure whether he wanted the Twilight role when he was first offered it after auditioning by performing a love scene with the already-cast Kristen Stewart; she persuaded the director, Catherine Hardwicke, that he was the actor to play the troubled vampire Edward Cullen. “I’d read the book and couldn’t really picture myself in the role of this handsome, perfect guy,” he says. “I didn’t know how big it was going to be.”

He was romantically involved with his co-star Stewart for three years but the romance ended when she reportedly had an affair with her Snow White and the Huntsman director Rupert Sanders. He is currently dating model Imogen Kerr although he politely declines to talk about his romantic life.

Reviewing how he arrived at where he is in life he uses a word which features frequently in his vocabulary – “ridiculous”.

“I’m extremely lucky which always makes me a little nervous,” he says. “I don’t quite know why I got so lucky but yeah, it’s just ridiculous and I’m pretty happy. Yeah, definitely pretty happy.”

The Rover is released on August 15.

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posted by Jun 15, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Movies, On the Set, Photos, Press, Twilight


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posted by Jun 13, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Press, The Rover, Twilight

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Robert Pattinson’s Life After ‘Twilight’

The vampiric Brit says his iconic turn in Twilight has become a burden—though again and again he’s stunned audiences with his smart, sensitive, and very un-Cullen-like performances.

Robert Pattinson isn’t Edward Cullen anymore.

For awhile, it seemed as if the eerily handsome British actor would have an impossible time getting past the iconic Twilight role that first brought him global fame and fortune. The series was too popular. His looks were too vampiric. And no one who plays the same part more than, say, three times ever really shakes it. (See: Connery, Sean.)

But in the years since the final Twilight installment came and went from theaters, Pattinson has begun to accomplish the impossible. Again and again he has chosen to work with brilliant auteurs—Werner Herzog, David Cronenberg, James Gray, Olivier Assayas—and again and again he has stunned audiences with his smart, sensitive, and very un-Cullen-like performances.

Pattinson’s latest movie, a spare, dystopian Western called The Rover, is his finest work yet. Under the direction of David Michod (the excellent Animal Kingdom), Pattinson stars as Rey, a gut-shot simpleton from the American South who encounters Eric (Guy Pearce) in the sweltering, lawless Australian outback ten years after a global economic collapse. In the wake of a botched heist, Rey’s gang—which includes Rey’s brother—has left him behind to die. The gang has also stolen Eric’s car. And so Rey and Eric team up to track them down. Pattinson is absolutely magnetic in the role, transforming what could have a been an embarrassing caricature of a man-child into empathetic portrait of a wounded human being struggling to think for himself for the first time—and ultimately succeeding. Not many actors can make cogitation look so compelling. Pattinson, somehow, is one of them.

To discuss his work in The Rover—and his career more generally—Pattinson recently sat down with The Daily Beast in Los Angeles. He was as striking in person as he is on screen—thin, white v-neck t-shirt, two-day scruff, artful bedhead. His demeanor is more boyish, and less confident, than one might expect of a movie star; he rarely made eye contact as he spoke and he laughed, half-nervously, whenever he said something revealing.

“I forget how to act in between every single movie,” Pattinson confessed.

He went on to talk about why Twilight has become a burden; why he could never do what Jennifer Lawrence does; and why he loves to work with auteurs such as Harmony Korine, with whom he’s planning to collaborate next. Pattinson also shot down the rumors that he will be taking over for Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones or Han Solo in the near future—although he didn’t shut the door on all future franchises.

You’ve said that you “really, really fought” for the role of Rey. Why?

Weirdly, I got sent the script and misread the email. I thought it was an offer. I was like, “Wow. I know exactly how to do this—and I never get offered stuff like this, ever!” So I call up my agent and I’m like, “I want to do it! I want to do it right now!” I had wanted to work with David Michod for years before this. But then they were like, “No, it’s just an audition. What are you talking about?” [Laughs] I suddenly had this pang of terror. I’ve basically messed up every audition I’ve ever gone for.

So what did you do?

I just realized I have to get it, so I just put in an enormous amount of time—way more work than I’ve ever done for an audition before.

What do you mean by “way more work”? What kind of labor are we talking about here?

I mean, I would just run it literally 10 hours a day for, like, two weeks.

Wow.

Completely obsessively, to the point where I was dreaming about it and stuff. I don’t know particularly what I was doing—just constantly thinking about it.

I guess it paid off.

[Laughs] Most auditions you don’t go in like you’re actually doing the movie. You do it like you’re doing an audition. But this I was just doing the movie in someone’s house. Full on.

You said you don’t usually get offered roles like Rey. How so?

Little weirdo roles. There are about five or six actors who have had a lock on them for years. [Laughs] I’m not sure what place I was really put in, but I wasn’t really part of that group of strange character actors—people who are a little bit “weak.” A little fragile and broken. I guess I wasn’t interpreted as being one of those people.

What was the biggest challenge for you in making The Rover?

Nothing really. Even before I got the part, I was so clear about how I wanted to do it. Really the only strange aspect was walking into the audition room and being like, “Am I doing this entirely wrong? I have no idea.” I had one little moment of panic. But as soon as I got I knew what I wanted the clothes to be, what I wanted the look to be—I knew everything. I wanted someone who couldn’t quite fulfill his emotions. He’s just constantly stuck between two things. And also someone who’s never really been required to think and is suddenly forced into thinking for the first time. Basically like playing a baby as an adult. It just felt so right, right from the beginning.

Did you base your portrayal of Rey on anyone in particular?

He’s a little bit like one of my cousins, actually. [Laughs] The clothes, the walk.

How was making The Rover different than making the Twilight movies?

It wasn’t freezing cold. [Laughs] I think that’s actually the biggest thing. When everyone’s so miserable because it’s so freezing cold…the boiling hot Australian outback I would take over the freezing cold any day.

Why?

The cold makes people stressed. There wasn’t as much light in the day to shoot with in Vancouver. And this was just, like, the same weather every day. There’s no one pressuring you to do anything. It’s David’s movie and there are basically only two people in it. You don’t have to rush anything. There’s only two egos you have to deal with. [Laughs]

The fewer egos, the better. Let’s rewind for a second: What made you want to be an actor in the first place—and what made you think you could do it?

I joined this drama club when I was 16 because I fancied this girl who went to it. [Laughs] I’d never done any acting before. But they were doing Guys & Dolls, and I’d never sung but for some reason I really wanted to be in it. [Laughs] I have no idea why, to this day. I did that, and another play afterwards, then randomly got an agent. But I think it was just the first time you do something—performance—it’s incredibly addictive. I remember doing Tess of the d’Urbervilles—the Thomas Hardy thing. I did this scene where I slapped Tess in the face. And just seeing people in the front row going [gasps in horror]—you suddenly have this massive burst of energy through you. Suddenly seeing people look at you like that—you’re like, “Wow! No one has ever looked at me like that before.”

It’s a strange feel. And then you start to feel it for yourself as you get older. You realize that you can get lost. It’s like doing music—you can do a scene and be like, “I don’t feel like myself at all.” And you don’t know where it came from. It’s kind of nice.

Getting away from yourself is an addictive feeling, isn’t it?

Yes. I used to play music all the time, and that was all I wanted to do in music—get to the point where you’re sort of floating. You don’t know how it happens, but it’s amazing. And it’s nothing to do with the audience or anyone else. You’re still probably shit. [Laughs] But it’s so addictive, and it’s so rare as well. You’re just constantly trying to go for that, every time.

Twilight was obviously a blessing to you. But how has it been a burden?

There’s been a lot of hate, actually. Honestly, though, I don’t understand the backlash against Twilight. The first movie, everyone liked it. But then it was suddenly… I don’t quite get why people turned on the other ones. There are plenty of successful franchises which everyone accepts. But for some reason there were all these political arguments against. People saying, “Oh, it’s a bad example for women.” Blah, blah, blah. As if we were all a bunch of dumbasses. We’re not playing it that way! That’s purely your interpretation! We’re not trying to make a movie about subservient female characters at all.

In a lot of ways, people have decided what Twilight is about before they’ve even thought about it, and then they’ve labeled us, the actors, as part of whatever that may be. Even the sparkling thing. I get so many sparkly criticisms! But I don’t actually remember a moment of in any of the movies where I sparkle. [Laughs] Maybe one second in the first one. It’s like, really? All these fanboys are like, “You’re sparkling!” And I’m like, “Really? You must have freeze framed that one second.” [Laughs] It’s just the idea of sparkling—people lost their minds over it.

But at the same time you find that the people who think they hate you can be incredibly loyal. They go to see your movies to hate on you. [Laughs] That’s fine with me!

What about artistically? Has all the Twilight hubbub—the cultural obsession around it—given people an inaccurate sense of who you are as an actor?

I don’t know who I am as an actor. I’ve found that the Twilight movies were probably the hardest jobs I’ve done. You have so many parameters to play the character within, and also you’re doing five movies where you have to play the same point every time and figure out different variations on it. It was really hard. It was like trying to write a haiku.

Did Twilight make you a better actor?

Yeah. It’s funny, because the reviews got worse.

But now that you’re doing movies like The Rover—darker, deeper, more artistic movies—do you feel like you’re trying to escape from Edward Cullen?

No, not at all. I never even thought of all the Twilights as a single entity. They were all separate movies for me. I mean, I forget how to act in between every single movie. [Laughs] But I’ve always thought that nothing comes for free. You get paid a bunch of money. You get a bunch of opportunities. And you’ve got to pay for it somehow. And in my case, I paid for it by having to figure out how to walk down the street [without getting mobbed]. I paid for it by people thinking I was one thing. That’s my major desire as an actor—to have no one know who I am. To have no preconceptions. So obviously when a character becomes iconic, you have to deal with the baggage that comes with it.

Since Twilight, you’ve been making a point of working with auteurs: Werner Herzog, David Cronenberg, James Gray, Olivier Assayas, David Michod. Why? Is this your way of making sure that people don’t peg you as “one thing”?

Those are the people I’ve loved since I was a teenager. It almost seems like a joke that I’m working with them now. They’re also people who have gotten performances out of actors that made me want to be an actor, before I even was an actor. Especially James Gray—Joaquin [Phoenix]’s stuff with James. That guy can get really singular performances out of people. And with Harmony Korine as well. Really it’s just limiting your margin for failure. I genuinely think you can’t fail doing a Werner Herzog movie or a Harmony Korine movie. You know they’re not going to just phone something in. They haven’t ever. Take Cronenberg. I still think Cronenberg is so cutting-edge—and he’s been working for 45 years. Whereas some people now are already flopping on their second movie. Already selling out.

Speaking of Cronenberg, you once said that making Cosmopolis “reinvigorated” your “ideas about acting.” How?

I just made me realize that I could be in those kinds of movies. All throughout doing Twilight, I got asked whether I was afraid of getting typecast. I started thinking, “Yeah, I guess I am.” Then I got cast in Cosmopolis, which was just so far from my wheelhouse, and I was like, “Oh, I guess I shouldn’t be afraid of being typecast anymore.” It freed me up. And I loved the experience so much—getting into Cannes was such a massive deal to me. I’m just trying to go after that again.

Which actors do you look at and say, “That’s the kind of career I want to have?”

I like what Joaquin has done. I’m always looking at his stuff—he’s been the most influential actor on me. And in a lot of ways I like Guy’s career as well. But he also does Australian stuff all the time, and I feel weird doing English things. I feel like I’m really naked.

What about someone like Jennifer Lawrence? She’s balanced two studio franchises with lots of meatier parts.

She’s amazing. She’s absolutely incredible. But also we’re different types of people. She seems like she’s super-confident—and I don’t have the kind of confidence. She glows. I think you can fit that into quite a few different areas. Whereas I’ve got a kind of sneak-through-the-cracks style.

The rumors are circulating, so I have to ask. Will you be the next Indiana Jones?

No. [Laughs] But I mean, I don’t know. That would be so funny if I suddenly got offered it. I’d be like, “Oh shit!” [Laughs]

So the rumor has no basis in reality?

No, no.

What about another famous Harrison Ford role: Han Solo? The buzz is that you’re being considered for a standalone Solo movie.

Oh no. I think all of these things are made up so I get tons of bad press.

Bad press? Those are two of the greatest characters in the history of Hollywood.

But literally this random story comes out and I get 50 other stories saying, like, “THAT GUY? NOOOO! What an asshole!”

For the record, though: you’re a fan of Han and Indy?

100 percent. Everyone is.

But that’s all for now.

Right.

Would you ever do another franchise?

Yeah. I’d have to put a lot of thought into it first. But in a lot of ways, those are the only big movies that are made anymore. [Laughs] So unless you just never want to do studio movies, you have to realize that you’ve got to do The Fault in Our Stars 2. [Laughs]

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posted by Jun 4, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Magazine, Movies, Press, The Rover, Twilight

'map to the stars' film photocall, 67th cannes film festival, france - 19 may 2014, ,
Updated translation by Laura, please credit the website.

After his Cannes escapade, where he ascended the famous steps, Robert Pattinson confided in Télepro.

We met the young British actor of 28 years for the release of his movie ‘The Rover’ this Wednesday, June 4th.

What do you think of your experience at the Cannes Festival?

It is not my first time on the Croisette, but it is always kind of an emotional shock for me (laugh). I am surprised to see at what point the people are passionate about movies… sometimes a little bit too much! I was shocked while reading some reviews about the movie, really virulent. I do not understand why some journalists are angry. There is such aggressiveness sometimes during the Festival. Some say it is part of the game in Cannes but, god, it is just a movie!

What are your favorite movies and who are your favorite actors?

I think I have seen ‘Fear and loathing in Vegas’ about a million times. I know all the dialogues! I am equally a huge fan of ‘One flew over a cuckoo’s nest’. I love ‘The Mask’ too. Jim Carrey is one of my favorite actors. He is one of the best comedians of his generation. I admire comical actors.

After the monstrous success of the saga, it must not be easy to move on from ‘Twilight’…

‘Twilight’ had been an exceptional adventure. I would certainly not be here without its movies. I owe everything to ‘Twilight’, but I am happy I moved on. I felt secure saying to myself if one of my projects did not work I would always have a ‘Twilight’ movie. Now that is not accurate anymore, I have to take risks in the choices I am making. And it forces me to be better.

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Thanks to Robert Pattinson France for the tip!

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Translation via Pattinson Art Work:

With two films in the official selection at Cannes, actor handle serenely the “post-Twilight.”

On a terrace of the Palais des Festivals swept by the wind, a man with his head tucked into his shoulders, pulls on his cigarette. A bodyguard stands a few meters from him. The anonymous smoker is Robert Pattinson. With two films in official selection, Maps To The Stars, by David Cronenberg, and The Rover, by David Michôd, the actor was one of the attractions in Cannes. When we arrive at our rendez-vous on the Croisette, he doesn’t look fit. The day before, he was doing the closing of the Silencio, the Parisian club relocated in Cannes during the festival. He woke up ten minutes before his appointments with the press.

He is tired and spontaneous, willing to talk about these two filmmakers who helped bury the sexy vampire. The hero of the Twilight Saga pays first his debt to the Canadian Cronenberg. Like in Cosmopolis, in 2012, Pattinson is back in a limousine in Maps to the Stars, but this time behind the wheel. “It’s a supporting role, but I said yes before even reading the script. I’d do anything with this guy.” His character is a limo driver in Hollywood who presents himself as an “actor writer.” “I used to say that at the beginning but not anymore,” jokes the British that moved to Los Angeles several years ago. “I missed London at the beginning, but most of my friends left and Los Angeles is a beautiful city, dynamic. And at the same time very weird. All depends on the people you hang out with…”

Simple Pleasures

In Hollywood, scripts and filmmakers go to him. Thus David Michôd, whose Pattinson admires his first film, Animal Kingdom, meets and chooses him among thousands of actors. Why him? “Because his face fascinates me, he is both beautiful and atypical” the director tells us. The actor spent seven weeks in the Australian desert, a nine-hour drive from the nearest town. He enjoys solitude, a real luxury for this young 28 year old man harassed by paparazzi.

After his love story and breakup with his partner from Twilight, Kristen Stewart, who made him the favourite prey of the tabloids, the star has rediscovered simple pleasures: “I loved being able to pee peacefully in the nature.” The former model has also enjoyed to break a little his icon image for teens with a borderline character. “At the first reading, I wondered if this guy was mentally handicapped. David Michôd told me he didn’t know. I did a lot of improvisation to, but I think they have all been cut off!”

Since, Pattinson shot with Werner Herzog and Anton Corbijn. Upcoming films with James Gray, Harmony Korine and Olivier Assayas has been announced. He would even be one of the contenders for the part of Indiana Jones, as a replacement of Harrison Ford. A boost to his career which doesn’t need one.

Source

Thanks to LeRPattzClub for the tip!

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