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posted by Jun 13, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Press, The Rover, Twilight

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Robert Pattinson’s Life After ‘Twilight’

The vampiric Brit says his iconic turn in Twilight has become a burden—though again and again he’s stunned audiences with his smart, sensitive, and very un-Cullen-like performances.

Robert Pattinson isn’t Edward Cullen anymore.

For awhile, it seemed as if the eerily handsome British actor would have an impossible time getting past the iconic Twilight role that first brought him global fame and fortune. The series was too popular. His looks were too vampiric. And no one who plays the same part more than, say, three times ever really shakes it. (See: Connery, Sean.)

But in the years since the final Twilight installment came and went from theaters, Pattinson has begun to accomplish the impossible. Again and again he has chosen to work with brilliant auteurs—Werner Herzog, David Cronenberg, James Gray, Olivier Assayas—and again and again he has stunned audiences with his smart, sensitive, and very un-Cullen-like performances.

Pattinson’s latest movie, a spare, dystopian Western called The Rover, is his finest work yet. Under the direction of David Michod (the excellent Animal Kingdom), Pattinson stars as Rey, a gut-shot simpleton from the American South who encounters Eric (Guy Pearce) in the sweltering, lawless Australian outback ten years after a global economic collapse. In the wake of a botched heist, Rey’s gang—which includes Rey’s brother—has left him behind to die. The gang has also stolen Eric’s car. And so Rey and Eric team up to track them down. Pattinson is absolutely magnetic in the role, transforming what could have a been an embarrassing caricature of a man-child into empathetic portrait of a wounded human being struggling to think for himself for the first time—and ultimately succeeding. Not many actors can make cogitation look so compelling. Pattinson, somehow, is one of them.

To discuss his work in The Rover—and his career more generally—Pattinson recently sat down with The Daily Beast in Los Angeles. He was as striking in person as he is on screen—thin, white v-neck t-shirt, two-day scruff, artful bedhead. His demeanor is more boyish, and less confident, than one might expect of a movie star; he rarely made eye contact as he spoke and he laughed, half-nervously, whenever he said something revealing.

“I forget how to act in between every single movie,” Pattinson confessed.

He went on to talk about why Twilight has become a burden; why he could never do what Jennifer Lawrence does; and why he loves to work with auteurs such as Harmony Korine, with whom he’s planning to collaborate next. Pattinson also shot down the rumors that he will be taking over for Harrison Ford as Indiana Jones or Han Solo in the near future—although he didn’t shut the door on all future franchises.

You’ve said that you “really, really fought” for the role of Rey. Why?

Weirdly, I got sent the script and misread the email. I thought it was an offer. I was like, “Wow. I know exactly how to do this—and I never get offered stuff like this, ever!” So I call up my agent and I’m like, “I want to do it! I want to do it right now!” I had wanted to work with David Michod for years before this. But then they were like, “No, it’s just an audition. What are you talking about?” [Laughs] I suddenly had this pang of terror. I’ve basically messed up every audition I’ve ever gone for.

So what did you do?

I just realized I have to get it, so I just put in an enormous amount of time—way more work than I’ve ever done for an audition before.

What do you mean by “way more work”? What kind of labor are we talking about here?

I mean, I would just run it literally 10 hours a day for, like, two weeks.

Wow.

Completely obsessively, to the point where I was dreaming about it and stuff. I don’t know particularly what I was doing—just constantly thinking about it.

I guess it paid off.

[Laughs] Most auditions you don’t go in like you’re actually doing the movie. You do it like you’re doing an audition. But this I was just doing the movie in someone’s house. Full on.

You said you don’t usually get offered roles like Rey. How so?

Little weirdo roles. There are about five or six actors who have had a lock on them for years. [Laughs] I’m not sure what place I was really put in, but I wasn’t really part of that group of strange character actors—people who are a little bit “weak.” A little fragile and broken. I guess I wasn’t interpreted as being one of those people.

What was the biggest challenge for you in making The Rover?

Nothing really. Even before I got the part, I was so clear about how I wanted to do it. Really the only strange aspect was walking into the audition room and being like, “Am I doing this entirely wrong? I have no idea.” I had one little moment of panic. But as soon as I got I knew what I wanted the clothes to be, what I wanted the look to be—I knew everything. I wanted someone who couldn’t quite fulfill his emotions. He’s just constantly stuck between two things. And also someone who’s never really been required to think and is suddenly forced into thinking for the first time. Basically like playing a baby as an adult. It just felt so right, right from the beginning.

Did you base your portrayal of Rey on anyone in particular?

He’s a little bit like one of my cousins, actually. [Laughs] The clothes, the walk.

How was making The Rover different than making the Twilight movies?

It wasn’t freezing cold. [Laughs] I think that’s actually the biggest thing. When everyone’s so miserable because it’s so freezing cold…the boiling hot Australian outback I would take over the freezing cold any day.

Why?

The cold makes people stressed. There wasn’t as much light in the day to shoot with in Vancouver. And this was just, like, the same weather every day. There’s no one pressuring you to do anything. It’s David’s movie and there are basically only two people in it. You don’t have to rush anything. There’s only two egos you have to deal with. [Laughs]

The fewer egos, the better. Let’s rewind for a second: What made you want to be an actor in the first place—and what made you think you could do it?

I joined this drama club when I was 16 because I fancied this girl who went to it. [Laughs] I’d never done any acting before. But they were doing Guys & Dolls, and I’d never sung but for some reason I really wanted to be in it. [Laughs] I have no idea why, to this day. I did that, and another play afterwards, then randomly got an agent. But I think it was just the first time you do something—performance—it’s incredibly addictive. I remember doing Tess of the d’Urbervilles—the Thomas Hardy thing. I did this scene where I slapped Tess in the face. And just seeing people in the front row going [gasps in horror]—you suddenly have this massive burst of energy through you. Suddenly seeing people look at you like that—you’re like, “Wow! No one has ever looked at me like that before.”

It’s a strange feel. And then you start to feel it for yourself as you get older. You realize that you can get lost. It’s like doing music—you can do a scene and be like, “I don’t feel like myself at all.” And you don’t know where it came from. It’s kind of nice.

Getting away from yourself is an addictive feeling, isn’t it?

Yes. I used to play music all the time, and that was all I wanted to do in music—get to the point where you’re sort of floating. You don’t know how it happens, but it’s amazing. And it’s nothing to do with the audience or anyone else. You’re still probably shit. [Laughs] But it’s so addictive, and it’s so rare as well. You’re just constantly trying to go for that, every time.

Twilight was obviously a blessing to you. But how has it been a burden?

There’s been a lot of hate, actually. Honestly, though, I don’t understand the backlash against Twilight. The first movie, everyone liked it. But then it was suddenly… I don’t quite get why people turned on the other ones. There are plenty of successful franchises which everyone accepts. But for some reason there were all these political arguments against. People saying, “Oh, it’s a bad example for women.” Blah, blah, blah. As if we were all a bunch of dumbasses. We’re not playing it that way! That’s purely your interpretation! We’re not trying to make a movie about subservient female characters at all.

In a lot of ways, people have decided what Twilight is about before they’ve even thought about it, and then they’ve labeled us, the actors, as part of whatever that may be. Even the sparkling thing. I get so many sparkly criticisms! But I don’t actually remember a moment of in any of the movies where I sparkle. [Laughs] Maybe one second in the first one. It’s like, really? All these fanboys are like, “You’re sparkling!” And I’m like, “Really? You must have freeze framed that one second.” [Laughs] It’s just the idea of sparkling—people lost their minds over it.

But at the same time you find that the people who think they hate you can be incredibly loyal. They go to see your movies to hate on you. [Laughs] That’s fine with me!

What about artistically? Has all the Twilight hubbub—the cultural obsession around it—given people an inaccurate sense of who you are as an actor?

I don’t know who I am as an actor. I’ve found that the Twilight movies were probably the hardest jobs I’ve done. You have so many parameters to play the character within, and also you’re doing five movies where you have to play the same point every time and figure out different variations on it. It was really hard. It was like trying to write a haiku.

Did Twilight make you a better actor?

Yeah. It’s funny, because the reviews got worse.

But now that you’re doing movies like The Rover—darker, deeper, more artistic movies—do you feel like you’re trying to escape from Edward Cullen?

No, not at all. I never even thought of all the Twilights as a single entity. They were all separate movies for me. I mean, I forget how to act in between every single movie. [Laughs] But I’ve always thought that nothing comes for free. You get paid a bunch of money. You get a bunch of opportunities. And you’ve got to pay for it somehow. And in my case, I paid for it by having to figure out how to walk down the street [without getting mobbed]. I paid for it by people thinking I was one thing. That’s my major desire as an actor—to have no one know who I am. To have no preconceptions. So obviously when a character becomes iconic, you have to deal with the baggage that comes with it.

Since Twilight, you’ve been making a point of working with auteurs: Werner Herzog, David Cronenberg, James Gray, Olivier Assayas, David Michod. Why? Is this your way of making sure that people don’t peg you as “one thing”?

Those are the people I’ve loved since I was a teenager. It almost seems like a joke that I’m working with them now. They’re also people who have gotten performances out of actors that made me want to be an actor, before I even was an actor. Especially James Gray—Joaquin [Phoenix]’s stuff with James. That guy can get really singular performances out of people. And with Harmony Korine as well. Really it’s just limiting your margin for failure. I genuinely think you can’t fail doing a Werner Herzog movie or a Harmony Korine movie. You know they’re not going to just phone something in. They haven’t ever. Take Cronenberg. I still think Cronenberg is so cutting-edge—and he’s been working for 45 years. Whereas some people now are already flopping on their second movie. Already selling out.

Speaking of Cronenberg, you once said that making Cosmopolis “reinvigorated” your “ideas about acting.” How?

I just made me realize that I could be in those kinds of movies. All throughout doing Twilight, I got asked whether I was afraid of getting typecast. I started thinking, “Yeah, I guess I am.” Then I got cast in Cosmopolis, which was just so far from my wheelhouse, and I was like, “Oh, I guess I shouldn’t be afraid of being typecast anymore.” It freed me up. And I loved the experience so much—getting into Cannes was such a massive deal to me. I’m just trying to go after that again.

Which actors do you look at and say, “That’s the kind of career I want to have?”

I like what Joaquin has done. I’m always looking at his stuff—he’s been the most influential actor on me. And in a lot of ways I like Guy’s career as well. But he also does Australian stuff all the time, and I feel weird doing English things. I feel like I’m really naked.

What about someone like Jennifer Lawrence? She’s balanced two studio franchises with lots of meatier parts.

She’s amazing. She’s absolutely incredible. But also we’re different types of people. She seems like she’s super-confident—and I don’t have the kind of confidence. She glows. I think you can fit that into quite a few different areas. Whereas I’ve got a kind of sneak-through-the-cracks style.

The rumors are circulating, so I have to ask. Will you be the next Indiana Jones?

No. [Laughs] But I mean, I don’t know. That would be so funny if I suddenly got offered it. I’d be like, “Oh shit!” [Laughs]

So the rumor has no basis in reality?

No, no.

What about another famous Harrison Ford role: Han Solo? The buzz is that you’re being considered for a standalone Solo movie.

Oh no. I think all of these things are made up so I get tons of bad press.

Bad press? Those are two of the greatest characters in the history of Hollywood.

But literally this random story comes out and I get 50 other stories saying, like, “THAT GUY? NOOOO! What an asshole!”

For the record, though: you’re a fan of Han and Indy?

100 percent. Everyone is.

But that’s all for now.

Right.

Would you ever do another franchise?

Yeah. I’d have to put a lot of thought into it first. But in a lot of ways, those are the only big movies that are made anymore. [Laughs] So unless you just never want to do studio movies, you have to realize that you’ve got to do The Fault in Our Stars 2. [Laughs]

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posted by Jun 4, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Magazine, Movies, Press, The Rover, Twilight

'map to the stars' film photocall, 67th cannes film festival, france - 19 may 2014, ,
Updated translation by Laura, please credit the website.

After his Cannes escapade, where he ascended the famous steps, Robert Pattinson confided in Télepro.

We met the young British actor of 28 years for the release of his movie ‘The Rover’ this Wednesday, June 4th.

What do you think of your experience at the Cannes Festival?

It is not my first time on the Croisette, but it is always kind of an emotional shock for me (laugh). I am surprised to see at what point the people are passionate about movies… sometimes a little bit too much! I was shocked while reading some reviews about the movie, really virulent. I do not understand why some journalists are angry. There is such aggressiveness sometimes during the Festival. Some say it is part of the game in Cannes but, god, it is just a movie!

What are your favorite movies and who are your favorite actors?

I think I have seen ‘Fear and loathing in Vegas’ about a million times. I know all the dialogues! I am equally a huge fan of ‘One flew over a cuckoo’s nest’. I love ‘The Mask’ too. Jim Carrey is one of my favorite actors. He is one of the best comedians of his generation. I admire comical actors.

After the monstrous success of the saga, it must not be easy to move on from ‘Twilight’…

‘Twilight’ had been an exceptional adventure. I would certainly not be here without its movies. I owe everything to ‘Twilight’, but I am happy I moved on. I felt secure saying to myself if one of my projects did not work I would always have a ‘Twilight’ movie. Now that is not accurate anymore, I have to take risks in the choices I am making. And it forces me to be better.

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Thanks to Robert Pattinson France for the tip!

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Translation via Pattinson Art Work:

With two films in the official selection at Cannes, actor handle serenely the “post-Twilight.”

On a terrace of the Palais des Festivals swept by the wind, a man with his head tucked into his shoulders, pulls on his cigarette. A bodyguard stands a few meters from him. The anonymous smoker is Robert Pattinson. With two films in official selection, Maps To The Stars, by David Cronenberg, and The Rover, by David Michôd, the actor was one of the attractions in Cannes. When we arrive at our rendez-vous on the Croisette, he doesn’t look fit. The day before, he was doing the closing of the Silencio, the Parisian club relocated in Cannes during the festival. He woke up ten minutes before his appointments with the press.

He is tired and spontaneous, willing to talk about these two filmmakers who helped bury the sexy vampire. The hero of the Twilight Saga pays first his debt to the Canadian Cronenberg. Like in Cosmopolis, in 2012, Pattinson is back in a limousine in Maps to the Stars, but this time behind the wheel. “It’s a supporting role, but I said yes before even reading the script. I’d do anything with this guy.” His character is a limo driver in Hollywood who presents himself as an “actor writer.” “I used to say that at the beginning but not anymore,” jokes the British that moved to Los Angeles several years ago. “I missed London at the beginning, but most of my friends left and Los Angeles is a beautiful city, dynamic. And at the same time very weird. All depends on the people you hang out with…”

Simple Pleasures

In Hollywood, scripts and filmmakers go to him. Thus David Michôd, whose Pattinson admires his first film, Animal Kingdom, meets and chooses him among thousands of actors. Why him? “Because his face fascinates me, he is both beautiful and atypical” the director tells us. The actor spent seven weeks in the Australian desert, a nine-hour drive from the nearest town. He enjoys solitude, a real luxury for this young 28 year old man harassed by paparazzi.

After his love story and breakup with his partner from Twilight, Kristen Stewart, who made him the favourite prey of the tabloids, the star has rediscovered simple pleasures: “I loved being able to pee peacefully in the nature.” The former model has also enjoyed to break a little his icon image for teens with a borderline character. “At the first reading, I wondered if this guy was mentally handicapped. David Michôd told me he didn’t know. I did a lot of improvisation to, but I think they have all been cut off!”

Since, Pattinson shot with Werner Herzog and Anton Corbijn. Upcoming films with James Gray, Harmony Korine and Olivier Assayas has been announced. He would even be one of the contenders for the part of Indiana Jones, as a replacement of Harrison Ford. A boost to his career which doesn’t need one.

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Thanks to LeRPattzClub for the tip!

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posted by May 22, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Maps to the Stars, Movies, Press, The Rover, Twilight

Google Translate:

Robert , you are in Cannes to present but not not one but two films. Is this a coincidence ?
This is a nice surprise, although I admit that I really wanted that The Rover in particular is shown here. Actually we missed all the other festivals in the hope to be here. It has even staked everything on Cannes because it is the most beautiful in the world . Particularly as for a different one film.

As Maps to the stars , this is a film constructed outside the Hollywood system . Is this an indicator of the direction you want your career after Twilight adventure ?
What guides me is the desire to work with a director . I realized that if I worked with the best in the world, there were chances that I am happy with the result ( smiles ) . I have work experience really satisfactory. There are twenty filmmakers with whom I want to work and I just started . The next ? This year Harmony Korine and Olivier Assayas . Then James Gray in January. We met , we became friends . And waited to find the right project .

In your place , many young players try to land a superhero role , or at least a role in a big franchise. Have you considered ?
I never auditioned for this kind of film. And I ‘m not even sure I know how to make a superhero. If I have my place in this world ( he thinks) . It does not mean that I would not do a big studio film at some point . Besides I look full. But I really struggled to find me there, as an actor.

“In the first assembly, some of my dialogues were inaudible “

In The Rover , you play a guy a little simpleton , which we do not know much except that he is the scapegoat of his brother. How did you get the role ?
On first reading , I heard his voice in my head. That of a guy who talks so low force being told to close his mouth. (laughs). So much so that every word that comes out of his mouth is suffering. It was great fun though watching the first cut , some of my dialogue was inaudible !

You are also the generic Maps to the stars , David Cronenberg . Hollywood depicts it is it as black as you know ?
I ‘ve always had a good time in Hollywood. Actually I like her dirty side as long as I do not spend the whole year, that I do not become a caricature as we see in the film. Remain an observer: I can tell you that there is a lot of weird people out there .

You often come across ?
All the time! Actually I am perhaps now …

Do not tell me you sell your stool on the Internet as the young actors of the movie!
Ah if I could … (laughs) Frankly everyone in Hollywood is a little crazy. The actors are in essence , if we consider that we are asked to play the variety of human emotions, sometimes in the same film. I assure you that you will struggle to meet more people dingo ! (laughs)

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posted by May 20, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Press, The Rover, Twilight, Videos

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CANNES, France — Robert Pattinson has terrible, rotted teeth and is caked in dirt for his leading role in The Rover. The star could not be happier with the transformation after years of being a heart throb in the Twilight films.

“I am trying to eliminate any bit of vanity,” says Pattinson of his grimed up role. “I want to avoid any opportunity to pose (for the camera). Or whatever. Because if you get that opportunity to pose, you will probably take it.”

The results have been impressive. Pattinson has earned some of the best reviews of his career in the David Michod film, which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival and opens in the USA June 13.

The post-apocolyptic story features a grimy Pattinson joining up with a former soldier (Guy Pearce) who is trying to get back his last precious possession on Earth — his stolen car.

The unglamorous lead role, along with a supporting role in David Cronenberg’s film A Map to the Stars, has earned Pattinson a return trip to the Cannes festival which he attended for the first time in 2012 (with Cronenberg’s Cosmopolis).

Pattinson says the 2012 trip set in motion a game plan to return to Cannes as much as possible.

“I decided right then I wanted to get every film into Cannes. It was something I have been specifically aiming for, 100%,” says Pattinson. “It’s just the best place to promote movies and this festival has this cachet.”

In Cannes 2012, the press conference monitor had to warn journalists before Pattinson took to the stage that he would not entertain questions about vampires.

This year, Pattinson seems to have finally gotten past that. He feels like a fixture at Cannes rather than a novelty. The word Twilight was not even mentioned in his press appearances, even if one Japanese television reporter asked Pattinson to simply say something to his fans back in Japan during a press conference (it was awkward).

“It’s strange. I have a disassociation now. It’s odd to live that same life,” says Pattinson of his Twilight past. “But I have always had that disassociation. I’ve never understood the crowds screaming. This is a job.”

The Rover also gave Pattinson the distinct advantage of being deep in the Australian Outback, where Pattinson was able to shoot a movie outdoors without fear of paparazzi jumping out of bushes.

“So there wasn’t some jackass trying to get a picture of me making a stupid face,” says Pattinson. “We were in a town of 50 people. They wouldn’t know who to sell a picture to even if they wanted to.”

He says the freedom allowed him to feel completely at ease out in the open and aided his performance. “It changed the whole way I worked completely,” says Pattinson. “It was totally losing self-consciousness. It was like working underwater. It was nice.”

He talks excitedly about working with director Olivier Assayas on their next, untitled film (* Idol’s Eyes*).

“His stuff always gets into Cannes and it’s such a great script,” says Pattinson. “But I don’t want to speak too soon.”

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But the actor with the biggest smile on his face may have been Robert Pattinson, who earned some of his best reviews yet for “The Rover,” the Australian action film directed by David Michod which screened to critics over the weekend. He also had strong buzz going into Monday’s competition debut of “Maps to the Stars,” a drama directed by David Cronenberg.

“He’s incredibly respectful,” Pattinson told Variety, saying he would love to collaborate with Cronenberg again. The two first worked together on 2012′s “Cosmopolis.”

Pattinson said that he’s getting ready to shoot actor Brady Corbet’s directorial debut, “The Childhood of a Leader.” He added that “Brady is just brilliant.” And Pattinson revealed that he’s been talking to “Spring Breakers” director Harmony Korine about starring in one of his upcoming projects, although the details haven’t been worked out yet.
Pattinson acknowledged the role of Edward Cullen that made him an international superstar came as a complete surprise.

“No one thought it was going to be a big deal,” Pattinson said of the 2008 vampire movie. “We thought it was going to be like ‘Thirteen,’” he said, referencing the directorial debut of Catherine Hardwicke.
“I couldn’t do another ‘Twilight’ movie,” said Pattinson, who is 28. “I’m too old.”

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