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Thanks @lurker1510 for the scan and the share!

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posted by Aug 24, 2014 • Filed in: Fan Submission, Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Newspaper, Photos, Press, The Rover

My friend Victoire went to London and brought back this newspaper where she found this review I found interesting (even if sometimes the reviewer uses terms as R-Patz once). Needed to share with you all! (Parts I found really nice about Rob are in strong)

Picture by Laura, if using please credit the website

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The wizards of Oz

THE ROVER, 4/5 STARS

The opening shot of this intense, dark and thoroughly watchable thriller tells us that the film we about to watch takes place “10 years after the Collapse”. What exactly has collapsed is not explained, but it’s obvious civiliation as we know it no longer exists.

It isn’t a nuclear holocaust, or an environmental disaster, as was so ably portrayed in the film version of Cormac McCarthy’s The Road: instead it seems to be related to the fall of Western civilisations backed by international finance. What is left is a straggly, rag-tag place where the hunt for bullets, fuel, water and food is the only game in town.

We meet scruffy loner Eric (Guy Pearce) as he pulls up at a roadside diner, populated by zonked-out staff playing loud Cambodian pop music.
As he sits nursing a dring, he notices his car is being stolen by three men, one of whom is badly wounded. He gives chase in the vehicule they have abandoned, and what rolls out is a story of how Eric wants his car back, and will stop at nothing to ensure this happens.

The Rover looks brilliant. The action runs accross the backdrop of the Aussie Outback. It is as iconic and beautiful as Ansel Adam’s old West.
Eric, covered in grime and sweat, has an intensely lost sense about his eyes, and Pearce manages to say much without opening his mouth. It is intriguing.
His sidekick – the brother of one of the gang, who he picks up en route, is played by Robert Pattinson, who made his name playing a hunky vampire. The hearthrob R-Patz turns in such a performance you will forget you are watching the pin-up who made the Twilight franchise. He is stumbling, bloody, brooding and brilliant.

Perhaps, best of all is what isn’t said: there is no need to expand on how Western capitalism has collapsed, leaving behind a dog-eat-dog world of drifters and misfits, survivors who live by a violent mantra. They’re folk who fester through days, stumbling from one deserted outpost to another, looking for canned goods, bullets and petrol. Nor do we need to much background on the leads: what the gang Eric is chasing have been up to is best left to the imagination, as why he should want his car back so badly when they have abandoned a perfectly good 4X4.

Above all, this violent, atmospheric and gripping film is a contemporary Western, a road movie with a dash of Mad Max about it. An interesting choice for Pattinson, the perfect vehicule for Pearce.

Thank you Victoire for the newspaper!

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Thanks @guccilicious31 for the picture and the share!

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posted by Aug 21, 2014 • Filed in: Fan Submission, Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Newspaper, Photos, Press, The Rover

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Thanks @word_scribbler for the picture and the tip!

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posted by Aug 21, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Newspaper, Press, The Rover

Pearce’s co-star in the film is Robert Pattinson, playing a slow-witted, vulnerable young man cast adrift in the desert; it’s a simultaneously brilliant and self-conscious performance, and one that shows his range way beyond the teenage silliness of the Twilight series, in which he played a brooding but chaste vampire.

Did the two former teen idols compare notes? “Rob’s on a stratospheric level that’s kind of crazy, really,” says Pearce. “But yes, I can relate to it. And I could see Rob enjoying the fact that he was a million miles from anywhere, being left alone.”

For someone as lacking in confidence as Pearce was, being thrust into the spotlight was troubling. He was lucky, he says, to have had the buffer of Kylie and Jason, who played the soap’s sweethearts, Charlene and Scott. “It’s a bit like hanging out with him,” he says, nodding in the general direction of Robert Pattinson, who is somewhere in the building. “You can sneak in the back way and no one even notices you because all the attention’s on them, which is great.”

To read the whole interview, CLICK HERE!

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posted by Aug 19, 2014 • Filed in: Fan Submission, Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Newspaper, Photos, Press

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Why RPatz went Down Under to escape the media spotlight

The Twilight star on why he had to travel to the Australian wilds to get away from those relationship rumours

Robert Pattinson quietly enters a plush hotel room, stifling a yawn and clutching a pair of expensive-looking shades.

“I can’t wait to get to a level where I can wear sunglasses during Press junkets,” he says, before breaking into a laugh.

The 28-year-old Twilight star has reached – and surpassed – the level of fame at which most Hollywood stars start wearing dark glasses indoors, but it doesn’t seem like he’ll be adopting a diva-like attitude anytime soon.

Six years since the hugely successful vampire franchise first hit screens, the actor, known to millions of young fans as RPatz, still doesn’t seem entirely comfortable being the centre of attention.

Heading to the remote Australian outback to make his new film The Rover last year, was a welcome change of scene for the star, who had faced months of speculation over his relationship with Twilight co-star Kristen Stewart, after photos of the actress embracing a married director were splashed around the world in 2012.

“It was incredibly peaceful,” London-born Pattinson says of his stint Down Under, cracking his knuckles as he speaks. “You really realise the value of your anonymity again and how priceless it is.

“But also, it was an unusual place as well. There was a mysticism to the area. It’s not like being out in nothingness; there’s an intensity to it.”

Since his eventual split from Stewart, Pattinson’s love life has still been generating headlines, with reports linking him to everyone from singer Katy Perry to Elvis Presley’s granddaughter Riley Keough.

And while he proved his acting chops post-Twilight, in David Cronenberg’s 2012 drama Cosmopolis and the period romp Bel Ami, he looks set to shed his teen idol image for good with his role in The Rover.

Set in a dystopian world, a decade after global economic collapse, he plays Rey, a petty criminal who is wounded in a botched heist as his fellow gang members make off in a stolen car. The car’s owner Eric (former Neighbours star Guy Pearce), is determined to get his only remaining possession back, and forces simple-minded Rey to join him and help hunt down the gang.

The ruffled hair and chiselled good looks which made Pattinson such a hit with Twilight fans are replaced with a deep Southern drawl, shaved head and brown teeth, modelled on “the kids at school who didn’t brush them”.

The actor – who landed his first big role playing Cedric Diggory in 2005′s Harry Potter And The Goblet Of Fire – laughs as he recalls how he initially wanted the physical transformation to go even further.

“I’d read this thing about how thieves in the Wild West had the tops of their ears snipped off as a punishment to show you were a thief. “I was like, ‘That would be so great!’. He’d be the type of person who’d get caught stealing something.”

As it happened, the director decided against it – which, in hindsight, Pattinson realises was probably for the best. “Thank God I didn’t have to have a prosthetic ear thing on the entire time.”

He describes Rey as “a little slow, and very, very needy … he feels like he needs people to look after him all the time”. So how did he get into character?

“I didn’t realise I was doing it, but all the guns were controlled by an armourer, who’s obviously very serious about guns,” he explains. “He got so p***** off when I started playing with them. And I realised that was getting me into character, annoying the armourer, breaking the guns. That’s exactly what Rey would be doing; constantly being told off.”

Pearce’s character gets frustrated with Rey, and even physically attacks him. But as their journey continues, a subtle bond develops between the pair.

Pattinson, who jokingly refers to the rather bleak film as “a buddy road trip movie”, enjoyed working with the “amazing” Pearce.

“Neither one of us knew exactly what the movie was about when we started, and so we were kind of figuring it out,” he adds.

“It’s not like one of us had a really set idea of how to do something and clashed with the other person. We were really trying to find it together, which doesn’t happen that often.”

Next up for the actor is the Werner Herzog film Queen Of The Desert, a biopic of the British explorer, archaeologist and writer Gertrude Bell.

Pattinson, who plays Lawrence of Arabia in the film, says landing the role was “just crazy”.

“I’ve been a fan of Herzog since I was 16. I met him for that job three years ago; I thought it was never going to happen and when it finally did, it was amazing. Riding around Morocco on a camel, it was pretty great.”

As for how indie films compare with blockbusters like Twilight, Pattinson admits The Rover was “an extreme one”, with the cast sleeping in makeshift accommodation on location.

“When you have a big budget, it creates expectations of how you’re supposed to be treated as an actor. And when you’re there (in the outback), there is literally no other option than staying in the shipping container. It’s kind of nice. Everyone’s on a totally equal footing, and it doesn’t give your vanity a chance to take hold.”

•The Rover is in cinemas now

From teen star to screen hunk

Douglas Thomas Pattinson was born in London on May 13, 1986, the youngest of three children.

While still at school, he joined a local drama club, “because I fancied this girl who went to it!”

After performing in productions like Guys And Dolls and Tess Of The D’Urbervilles, he caught the attention of an acting agent.

Post-Harry Potter, he successfully auditioned to play vampire Edward Cullen in Twilight, which propelled him to global heart-throb status.

Pattinson once confessed: “You get girls like, ‘I want to have your babies!’ It’s like, seriously, I don’t even want to have my babies.”

His performance in Cosmopolis required him to get steamy in a car with French actress Juliette Binoche. He said the scene was “so funny – we had just met one another before we had to shoot it”.

His older sister Lizzy is a singer who recently auditioned for the new series of The X Factor.

“I’m ridiculously proud of her. I would never have the (guts) to do that, never in a million years,” he’s previously said.

A real ladies man…

Hollywood rumour has it that Twilight co-stars and former lovers Kristen Stewart and Robert Pattinson are back together once again.

The two on-again, off-again lovers have not confirmed or denied the rumours, but reports from eyewitnesses continue to spot them together.

Since they met on the set of Twilight in 2008, Pattinson has been continually linked to Stewart.

For a long time, however, the two refused to confirm a relationship, but paparazzi photographs and eyewitness accounts drove intense media and fan speculation and attention.

Eventually, though, Stewart officially acknowledged her relationship with Pattinson for the first time in July 2012, when Us Weekly published affectionate photos of Stewart with her Snow White and the Huntsman director, Rupert Sanders.

The day the photos were released, Stewart issued a public apology to Pattinson, saying, “I’m deeply sorry for the hurt and embarrassment I’ve caused to those close to me and everyone this has affected.

“This momentary indiscretion has jeopardised the most important thing in my life, the person I love and respect the most, Rob. I love him, I love him, I’m so sorry.”

Since their 2012 split, Pattinson has been seen out with a string of beautiful women.

These include singer Katy Perry, actresses Elle Fanning and Isla Fisher and Hollywood agent Stephanie Ritz.

Last week, they revealed that they will both attend this year’s Toronto International Film Festival.

Pattinson’s Maps to the Stars and Stewart’s Still Alice will both be screened during the festival.

Source

Thanks @socalmom2four for the tip!

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posted by Aug 15, 2014 • Filed in: Fan Submission, Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Newspaper, Photos, Press, The Rover

Thanks @ohmy50shades for the share!
The article from The Guardian:

Robert Pattinson portrait

There is a moment in The Rover, David Michôd’s futuristic western set in the Australian outback, in which Robert Pattinson’s character sits in the cab of a truck at night listening to the radio play Keri Hilson’s hit Pretty Girl Rock. The night is black and the radio tinny, and softly Pattinson begins to sing along. “Don’t hate me ’cause I’m beautiful,” he sings, his voice high and whiny, the lyrics muffled by lips that cling to dirty teeth. “Don’t hate me ‘cause I’m beautiful.”

It’s a pivotal moment for Rey, the slow, needy, uncertain young man Pattinson plays, but it also feels like something of a reference point in the career of the actor himself; a small reminder for the audience of just how far he has run from his days as the pretty-boy Hollywood pin-up.

The Pattinson who walks into our interview this morning seems to play a similar trick, pointing out, two steps into the room, that the hotel carpet “looks like a Magic Eye picture”. And indeed it does – a bold, blurry pattern in stripes of cream and black. But Pattinson’s remark also serves to shifts attention neatly away from himself, as if he is weary of being the centre of it, the face that everyone stares at.

Pattinson was 22 when he was first cast as Edward Cullen in the Twilight Saga, the five-part movie adaptation of Stephanie Meyer’s best-selling teen vampire novels. Overnight he became one of Hollywood’s most adored young stars, pursued wherever he went by paparazzi and screaming fans. He was named “the most handsome man in the world” by Vanity Fair, and one of the 100 Most Influential People by Time. Amid all the fuss and the madness he embarked upon a tortuous relationship with his co-star, Kristen Stewart, that meant the young couple were rarely out of the gossip pages.

He is 28 now. The final Twilight instalment done, the Stewart romance finished, he is finally cutting a dash as a serious actor.

Early leading-man roles (Remember Me; Water for Elephants) have given way to more challenging characters – he earned impressive reviews for his portrayal of a young billionaire in David Cronenberg’s adaptation of Don DeLillo’s Cosmopolis, and will soon be seen in another Cronenberg project, Maps to the Stars – as well as starring alongside Nicole Kidman in the Gertrude Bell biopic Queen of the Desert.

But for now he is rooted in Michôd’s The Rover, a brilliantly dark story of a loner (Guy Pearce) in pursuit of a gang of ramshackle crooks who have stolen his car. En route, he acquires Rey (Pattinson), the brother of one of the thieves, whom they had left for dead at the scene of a botched robbery, and together they chug through the Australian desert, now a glowering, lawless land 10 years after a global economic collapse.

“I just thought it was strikingly original,” Pattinson says of first reading Michôd’s script. “Even in the way it looked on the page.

“David’s got a very specific way of writing dialogue. It’s very functional, the writing’s very harsh, it’s savage, but it didn’t feel just stylised writing – it was emotional as well. It just seemed so natural compared to something like No Country for Old Men. I always felt that was more like film writing. And this didn’t really feel like a film script – it felt like a dream.”

Pattinson has a very particular way of speaking: he will talk softly, intently about subjects you sense mean a great deal to him – Michôd’s writing, for instance, or the craft of acting – only to then sweep it to one side with a flourishing “It was crazy!” or a burst of wheezy, slightly wild laughter. It gives the impression of someone who has not quite yet settled into his skin.

He had to audition for The Rover – a process he loathes. “I’m quite good at doing meetings,” he says. “If I’m just meeting someone about a job I’m like a dog, especially if my agent’s said to me: ‘A lot of people want this job.’ Then I’m like: ‘Oh yeah? Then I will do anything to get it!’” What’s his technique? “I don’t know, I just become a bullshit artist!” he laughs. “That’s when I start acting! I’m really much better at doing it when the cameras aren’t rolling …”

But auditions petrify him. He has spoken of the good 45 minutes of “neuroses” he has to suffer before any audition can ever really begin. “I just can’t … I literally can’t do it,” he tries to explain. “It’s just me looking uncomfortable, trying to put on an American accent … or sitting in the corner, making myself throw up and punching myself in the face.” What helps get him past the neuroses, what happens after those excruciating 45 minutes that helps him perform. “Just that you think that someone actually believes you can do something,” he says. “That makes me sound like such an idiot. It’s crazy.”

But the joys of acting still outweigh these moments.

“For whatever reason, I think there’s something profoundly satisfying about being able to watch something you’ve done afterwards, or to just do a scene and feel like: ‘Oh, I just had an out-of-body experience for a second!’”

He pauses. “Just for one second,” he says gently. “And generally people don’t even notice. It feels literally like you’ve been asleep for a second.” He recalls such a moment while shooting this film. “It’s not the biggest scene, it’s not even in the movie, it was the rehearsal. And me and Guy had just been going so nuts – we’d been out in the desert and we’d become like crazy homeless people. And I turned around and looked at him and just realised actually, we’re not acting any more.” He laughs. “And why did that feel so good? It’s so weird.”

It’s easy to assume that being tethered to the long-running Twilight Saga held him back from experiencing such moments, from growing as an actor, but he argues that the role required more resources than most. “I think Twilight’s probably the hardest part I’ve done,” he says, “because to do it for five movies, it’s really hard to think of stuff that’s maybe not boring. Especially if you don’t die. Because what’s the drama? You’re not scared of anything! And that’s the whole essence of drama: life and death.”

Pattinson was born and raised in London, but many of his film roles have required an US accent. In The Rover, Rey is from the American South, and like many has relocated to Australia in search of work in the mines. It was the voice, he says, that led him into the character.

He recalls “losing my mind” during his first day on set. “It just didn’t feel right for ages,” he says. “And then there was this one little thing – I had this makeup on my teeth, and it kept rubbing off all the time. It was really putting me off – it meant I had to keep redoing scenes. So I started trying to do this thing where I covered my teeth with my lips. And it changes your voice a little bit, but I thought: ‘Oh, that’s really cool!’ And after that I started speaking like that ‘ouhhggghhh …’” he replicates the style, and then laughs. “It’s so silly, it’s so stupid! I was just kind of making the accent up, I don’t even know what state it is really.”

But for Pattinson, having the opportunity to play a grubby-toothed mumbler from an unidentified corner of the American South proved liberating, as did the fact that his character plays second fiddle to that of Pearce. “There’s something about Rey, and there’s something about not having to drive the story forward,” he explains. “You can just be the condiment. It’s really kind of freeing just being the sidekick weirdo.”

He is full of praise for Pearce, for his physicality and his ability to transform himself for the role. He speaks of how, for much of their time on set, he thought Pearce to be physically bigger, and of his strange surprise when filming ended to find him not only clean-shaven but also somehow reduced in stature.

“And I liked seeing that Guy, even after having done tons and tons of movies is still scared,” he adds. “I’ve worked with some actors who, having done so many movies, they just know what they’re gonna do. No matter what I would be doing in a scene they would have practised their part in a mirror already and that was it, whereas Guy is really trying to find it still. So that was why it was more fun – because neither of us really knew what the movie was about when we started. But he’s not afraid to let it happen. And there’s very few actors who’ve been doing it as long as he has that still approach it like that, that still have that element of danger.”
Robert Pattinson portrait “Very few actors still have an element of danger,” says Pattinson.

How did they find out what the movie was about? “I think it’s about the feel,” Pattinson says. “I think after I did Cosmopolis I realised that trying to psychoanalyse parts and trying to be all clever about it … well, it only really started with actors in the 50s, and for thousands of years before that it was just about voice and using your body as a performance instrument …” he gives a faintly embarrassed laugh. “So I generally think whatever feels nice, it’s probably right.”

What felt nice in this role was the language, he says. “It was all the little speech patterns. It was like a song — if you’re singing a song in a certain way you’re not trying to make it sound sad or something, it just is.” He frowns. “I keep trying to do that in movies, but it’s really difficult trying to find scripts that allow for it, that mean you don’t have to hit specific thematic beats.”

Occasionally he tries to write something himself. “I was trying to write a play the other day and I showed it to my assistant and didn’t quite realise how bad it was.” He laughs and laughs. “I was writing it totally by myself in the middle of the night thinking: ‘This is how you do it! You just stay up all night and keep writing!’ She came in the next morning, and I’d been up all night writing. I said to her: ‘You have to read this! It’s amazing!’” He could tell it was perhaps not, he says, from her facial expressions as she read. “And then she said: ‘It’s not in English … and half the time you haven’t even put the character names in so it’s just a stream of consciousness …’”

But he would like to be in a play, he says. “Something in a really small theatre. I don’t think I could do something on Broadway … But I’d quite like to do something kind of shocking.”

He likes being shocking, he says, and his next role is satisfyingly so. Starring alongside Robert De Niro in Olivier Assayas’s Idol’s Eye, he will play a small-time criminal caught up with the Chicago mafia. “My character is this slightly delusional lost child,” he says. “Everyone always glamorises criminals – it feels inevitable in movies – but in this it’s really not glamorised. It is quite dense. It’s really serious. Very political.”

I think of something he told me earlier, about the ways in which he believes Twilight has influenced his career, and of how he wagers that most cinema audiences have judged him before he has uttered a single line on the screen. I pictured his frustration, the effort of forever trying to shake off that famous role, but on the contrary, he explained, he enjoys the possibilities that tension brings.

“It’s kind of fun,” he said. “Because people have preconceived ideas about you, and sometimes it affords you the opportunity to shock people more.”

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posted by Aug 15, 2014 • Filed in: Fan Submission, Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Newspaper, Photos, Press, The Rover

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Thanks @ElizaAdoresRob for the picture and @Roboshayka for the tip!

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