posted by Oct 23, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Maps to the Stars, Movies, Press, Reviews

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Read a list of reviews collected for “Maps to the Stars”!

The Good

The Eh

The Ugly

Video Reviews

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posted by Oct 23, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Press, Reviews, The Rover

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Read a list of reviews collected for “The Rover”! The Good, the Eh, and the Bad, reviews from all over the world can be seen under the cut!

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You can check Lizzy’s first steps on X Factor UK in our previous post, HERE!

You can also see Lizzy finding out who her coach was in another previous post, HERE!

LIZZY GOES TO THE JUDGE’S HOUSES!!!!

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PART ONE OF LIZZY’S BOOTCAMP (September 27, 2014):

LIZZY FIGHTS TO STAY:

LIZZY BACKSTAGE FUN:

Back ups here!

Read the full article »

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Thanks @guccilicious31 for the pictures!
THE INTERVIEW:

Robert Pattinson interview: Twilight actor on new film Map to the Stars and ‘having money for the first time’

‘Maps to the Stars’ is the title of the new David Cronenberg film starring Robert Pattinson.

It refers to the Hollywood cartography that informs tourists where to find the homes of their favourite actors. Anyone buying one of these plans will be tremendously disappointed if they are looking for the home of Britain’s most famous vampire. Last year the actor decided to sell his mansion in Griffith Park, near the famous Hollywood sign in central Los Angeles, saying he was too young to be tied to such a lavish property and instead wanted to lay low and live life to his needs rather than his means.

The house was so amazing,” he says of the abode that he sold for $6.37m. “I wasn’t really thinking when I got it. I was just living in LA and had been living in and out of hotels, and you have money for the first time.”

When he says money, he means a mind-boggling amount, for anyone, not just a young British actor. He reportedly received $20m for the final part of Twilight, the saga that made him a global name, and made his private life fodder for public consumption. Pattinson reveals that the selling of the house is part of a general disassociation with Hollywood. “If you are the kind of person who needs to be pushed into doing something, then Hollywood is not the right place, so I think I might be done with Los Angeles. I’ve just realised that in the past few weeks.

We meet on the day of the Toronto Film Festival premiere of Maps to the Stars and there is a yearning for Barnes, West London, where he grew up. His dad imported vintage cars from America, and his mother worked for a modelling agency, a profession Pattinson entered just before he hit his teens. “I think I need to spend more time in London, or just move around a bit more. I’ve been in LA for six or seven years or something and it’s weird. The more you stay there, especially as an actor, the more you think you need to be there, that you’ll be missing out on something by leaving, but you are not really. It’s a fun city, though, but you are permanently on holiday there. I feel like I’ve been on holiday there since I was 22.

It seems the 28-year-old has had enough of the focus being on his romantic life rather than his career. His relationship with fellow Twilight star Kristen Stewart dominated headlines before a very public split after she was caught cheating on him by a paparazzo’s lens, and now there’s endless speculation that he’s going out with every girl who happens to be in the same room as him. The fascination with his love life must be frustrating because, since the Twilight franchise ended, not many column inches have been expended on the impressive résumé he has been building.

In addition to working with Cronenberg twice, he gave one of his best performances as a left-for-dead armed robber in David Michôd’s Australian outback thriller The Rover and he’s just finished playing TE Lawrence for Werner Herzog in Queen of the Desert and photographer Dennis Stock for Anton Corbijn . On the horizon is an adaptation of David Grann’s book The Lost City of Z, to be directed by James Gray.

The impressive list has come about because the actor has been seeking out auteurs: “In the last two years, I’ve just done stuff just for the director and not really thought that much about the script,” he says. “Now I’m swinging it back a little bit, trying to get a medium between the two

He’s clearly thankful to the Canadian director Cronenberg for taking a chance on him, especially when people wondered if all he had to offer was a blank stare into the eyes of his co-stars. “After working with Cronenberg it just opened stuff up. People sort of approach you in a different way. I think also when it got into Cannes as well. Now I’ve done a few other things and it kind of works on a bit of a roll, working with auteur-y guys.

There is an odd link between Cosmopolis and Maps to the Stars, in that in Cosmopolis he played a financial hotshot who went around New York in his limo for pretty much the whole movie, whereas in Maps he plays a limo driver who wants to be a screenwriter. Pattinson quips, “It’s a bit weird. It’s like Cosmopolis was the audition for this: ‘Well he fits into a limo, why look for someone else?’

Maps to the Stars is about the odd characters that populate Hollywood. Pattinson has an affair with a personal assistant (Mia Wasikowska) and then memorably has sex on the back seat of a car with her boss, Havana – Julianne Moore won the best actress gong at Cannes for her portrayal of an actress whose best days are behind her. It’s a Hollywood full of oddball characters that Pattinson knows all too well; “I’ve met characters that are pretty similar to those depicted. Everyone is saying that the film’s so biting, but I think it’s sympathetic to a host of characters. Women like Havana, in reality people would despise her, they don’t have any friends for a reason, but I don’t think anyone comes out of the movie hating her and I think that’s testament to Julianne’s performance. It’s interesting and that’s why people are interested in the subject, it’s a bunch of weirdos who spend a lot of time self-obsessing and talk about it afterwards.

The 28-year-old says he’s not exactly in a position to talk: “I self-obsess a lot. When I’m doing interviews I’m always waiting for some stupid remark to come out.” When he first entered the room, his opening gambit to me was, “I’m so bad at doing press junkets”. As he said this he had a glint in his eye that gave the impression he thinks much of it is a charade. “I try to avoid getting into any subject where I’m locked into something. It’s not like I’m a politician or something. I used to be so dumb in interviews, I used to try and make jokes all the time and everyone is thinking, ‘this guy is a moron, he’s just been saying dumb stuff for years and years’.

Herzog is a director he has long admired and he jumped at the change to appear in his Gertrude Bell biography Queen of the Desert, starring Nicole Kidman as the British archaeologist who helped draw the border between Iraq and Jordan at the turn of the 19th century. Pattinson has subsequently found out from his dad that he’s related to the traveller.

In the film he plays TE Lawrence. “It’s sort of close to the real guy, it’s certainly not [the film] Lawrence of Arabia-like,” he says. “At the same time the guy was really small and I’m not physically kind of right for the part, but I think I have quite a good little handle of who he is. After I got cast I started researching and there are certain things you can’t do as I’m just not physically the same so I had to invent it a little bit, and it’s a small part as well. The film’s about Gertrude Bell, it’s really not about making Lawrence of Arabia.

And doing smaller role suits him just fine: “It’s quite nice doing small parts. Then the film isn’t totally reliant on what I do in it, so I get to work with who I want to work with and it’s not my fault if it doesn’t make any money.

‘Maps to the Stars’ is out now

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posted by Sep 20, 2014 • Filed in: Fan Submission, Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Newspaper, Photos, Press, Reviews

SCANS:

TRANSCRIPT:

Robert Pattinson – The New Paper Singapore

Making the transition from teen idol to respected actor is not easy feat.

How do you convince moviegoers and directors that you are more than a pretty one-trick pony?

Robert Pattinson, blessed with those looks and that hair, has tried to leave the several times to leave the idol image behind, without much success.

But the 28-year-old is seeing light at the end of the tunnel with new film The Rover.

Critics, who once had a good time hating the Brit actor, are singing a new tune with many calling the movie Pattinson’s redefining moment.

So how did Pattinson finally unshackle himself from the teen idol label to become a critics choice actor?

1. Keep on working

Perseverance is a virtue that Pattinson has embraced since breaking out with Twilight in 2008.
A quick look on IMDb shows the actor never stopped working during and after his Twilight days.

2. Stucks to his guns

Staying away from romance and high profile movies seems to have worked well for Pattinson, whose grungier and more adult role are markedly different from being Edward.
He auditioned hard for The Rover as it was a role that appealed to him and one that would ‘shock people’.

3. Worked with choice film-makers

Pattinson found a mate in Cronenberg. His second Cronenberg film, Maps To The Stars, received favourable reviews when it premiered in Cannes last May. Open here on November 20.
He has also completed two dramas – Werner Herzog’s Queen Of The Desert and Anton Corbijn’s Life. Soon working with Harmony Korine and James Gray.
Pattinson is about to start work on Idol’s Eye, where he’ll play a ‘small-time crook’ opposite Robert De Niro.

4. Changed his look

Countless websites have dedicated themselves to following the evolution of Pattinson ‘glorious mane’, which was a big draw for his fans.

5. Accepted his idol status

Pattinson seems to acknowledge the power that comes with being named ‘the most handsome man in the world’ by Vanity Fair, and one of the ’100 Influential People’ by Time.

As much as he would like to shake off the Twihards, he probably knows he would not be who he is without their fervent presence.

Thanks @ibabysky for the scans AND translation!

Here is the original interview by Yahoo Singapore:

EN Interview 1 – It’s late afternoon in Cannes, and heartthrob, Robert Pattinson, 28, appears to be having a good time at the world’s most glamorous film festival promoting the Rover, starring alongside Guy Pearce, 46. He will also star opposite Julianne Moore, 53, in Maps to the Stars, both slated for release this summer.

His hair is short, he has a little facial stubble and he’s wearing a turquoise jacket, black shirt and dark jeans and sneakers.

Pattinson is of course best known for his role as Edward, a vampire who falls in love with a human, Bella, played by on again off again girlfriend, Kristen Stewart, 24, in The Twilight Saga.

Since then, Pattinson has taken on more serious roles such as Remember Me (2010) and Water for Elephants (2011) in which he starred alongside Reese Witherspoon.

Famous for his good looks, Pattinson is often seen topping the ‘hottest’ lists in many publications such as People (2008 and 2009) and Glamour UK, yet he remains humble. He is also the face of Dior Homme, which he took on after Jude Law.

THE INTERVIEW:

Q: Are you a fan of the Mad Max films?

PATTINSON: I have actually never seen them. I have been asked so many times this morning and I have never seen it. (laughter) I guess I have got to see it now.

Q: This whole genre, is it familiar to you?

PATTINSON: Yeah, but I think this one is kind of different. I mean, it’s not like everyone has gone crazy, and they are cannibals. There feels something more real about it, and also I think the world where the movie is set, it’s not that the entire world is like that, they are just in the middle of nowhere. The country has just become very unstable and anything could collapse at any second. It’s sort of like the new society is trying to be born again.

Q: Is the collapse of society a familiar fear to you that you can relate to?

PATTINSON: Not really. I think the world is quite resilient, but I don’t know I think it would be a bit of fun. But I am a bit of a nihilist. (laughter)

Q: Was it fun on the set with Guy Pearce? Was he intimidating?

PATTINSON: No, and he’s also really strong as well. So when you are being thrown around, it actually hurts quite a lot. (laughter) And he was really in it the whole time because he’s really not like that.

Q: So he’s a good actor like you. Is this something that’s really important to you when you work?

PATTINSON: Yeah, one hundred percent. I mean, I think, I always hear some actors saying they didn’t read reviews or care about it, and I just think they are making it up. (laughs) Everybody cares about it; whether people think it’s good.

Q: What was the most difficult thing for you to create this character, to make him special in a way?

PATTINSON: I mean a lot of it was just there in the script at the beginning and I just really connected to it. I mean the most difficult thing was getting the job. But I think once I was doing it, it was quite fun. It was an exciting part to play and David Cronenberg kind of let me sort of run with any idea as well.

Q: And the accent thing, was that your idea?

PATTINSON: He was supposed to be from the South, but literally only said he was from somewhere in the South, so I don’t know, that was the kind of voice I heard in my head when I was reading the script.

Q: And you said it was more difficult to get the job.

PATTINSON: I mean, I just hate auditioning and I am really, really bad at it. I get so nervous and mess it up for myself and so I have basically tried to avoid doing auditions at all costs. I read the script and I was like, I really, really, really have got to get this part. It’s weird though, preparing for a part that you are already cast and just actually doing it for real and just kind of hoping that your anxiety doesn’t get the better of you in the room.

Q: And you got a phone call? What happened?

PATTINSON: I got a second audition afterwards and then they told me at the end of it, and it was a kind of amazing feeling.

Q: And so was it the first time you went to Australia shooting?

PATTINSON: I have been to Sydney just a couple of times to work, but yeah, in that area definitely.

Q: Are you done with the blockbuster thing or are you possibly returning to that at some point in your career?

PATTINSON: Yeah, it’s waiting for the right director. Nothing has come up and I mean, that’s not saying I don’t want to do it, but blockbusters, big movies just take a really long time to shoot as well. So I think you have to really, really, really want to do it. There’s a lot of pressure and you just don’t get that many interesting parts in big movies, especially for young guys. It’s just the same thing every time.

Q: Lots of comic book adaptations. Is there some character that you would say, yeah, I would do it?

PATTINSON: Yeah maybe, I was never really that into comic books when I was a kid and stuff so I don’t really have that connection. You also have to work out like tons, (laughter) in potentially a movie you might not like. It’s just a big hassle. (laughs)

Q: Maps to the Stars was excellent. So when you first read the script, what did you make of it?

PATTINSON
: I thought it was hilarious and I liked some of the lines (laughter) I am excited about seeing it with an audience. But that’s Cronenberg; he’s quite into being subversive and quite combative and stuff. It’s kind of amazing that he’s still doing that, he’s 72.

Q: Have you seen people who actually almost act like that?

PATTINSON: A lot of the young kids in it, I have seen a lot of them. I think they are the most honest. And Havana, there are lots of actresses who kind of go a little bit crazy. But the kids, that’s like quite a mainstream thing, this kind of hatred. There’s a lot of negative energy, I don’t know why, it’s just really odd.

Q: You played music on Twilight – will you release a record one day?

PATTINSON: I want to make one, I just don’t really know about releasing one. (laughs) I don’t know, I can’t really deal with criticism very well and I have already got criticism coming from one angle (laughs) and I don’t feel the need to get it from somewhere else.

Q: What would it sound like? What music would you make?

PATTINSON: I don’t know yet. I mean I always used to record kind of singer-songwriters stuff and I don’t really want to do that. I was trying to figure out something else, but yeah, I don’t know yet. Trying to figure out my new sound.

Q: Back in The Rover, you were singing, Don’t hate me because I am beautiful, and do you think it’s biographical in this?

PATTINSON: No. I thought it was really funny that Ray would know the lyrics of that song. (laughter)

Q: For Cronenberg you don’t have to do auditions anymore. Are you and he a good team? What is it like?

PATTINSON: Yeah, I didn’t audition for Cosmopolis either. I don’t know how that happened. But I mean, yeah, I would do anything with him. I said yes before I read the script, and I would do anything.

Q: Can you tell us anything about the new project with Olivier Assayas? I read somewhere that you were in it.

PATTINSON: It’s a gangster movie. It’s a true story about a bunch of thieves who rob a porn shop in Chicago without realising that it’s a front for the mafia. I mean it’s quite a simple story but it’s so densely written and it follows the real story incredibly well and that’s thing that Assayas can do really well. It’s late 70s, he gets the environment. It’s incredibly realistic and a real ensemble thing, like twelve amazing parts in it. It’s really cool, it’s really, really cool. (laughter)

Q: Are you hoping with that to be back here in Cannes? You come here every year, is it a goal for you?

PATTINSON: (laughs) Yeah hopefully. It kind of seems like a bit of a Cannes movie, but it’s cool though. It’s really brutal, but it feels like a totally un-cliché gangster movie, which is totally difficult to do.

Q: Do you also like the pressure that you feel in Cannes?

PATTINSON: Yeah definitely. Definitely at a screening, it’s definitely a different energy and not like a normal premiere where it’s just like friends of the studio or whatever. It’s kind of like there’s a very real chance people are going to be vocal about if they like it or not. It’s exciting. But I think people are more interested, and people talk about the movies afterwards and they are not just going to the screening so they can go to the party afterwards, they actually want to see it. (laughs)

Q: Can you watch yourself objectively on the screen?

PATTINSON: Yeah, I am quite good at doing that. I used to not be, and I only really watch anything I do once or twice, but it’s not like I hate everything, and I learn stuff afterwards. Like, I watch playback when I am doing a movie. I think it’s quite good, the technical things.

Q: For The Rover, your character learns shooting and defending himself, so what are your feelings about weapons? Is it something you were familiar with?

PATTINSON: Not really, I am not that big of a fan. (laughs) I don’t know, I grew up in England and I just think it’s weird, people having guns, it’s kind of silly. (laughs)

Q: But it’s an American thing too. They think they need guns?

PATTINSON: I mean, I think people should just get rid of them all together. (laughs)

Q: What are the personality traits that you have that would work in that world?

PATTINSON: I am quite good at being by myself, I would probably just go hide in the woods and stay there forever. (laughs)

Q: What about violence? Do you ever read the script and wonder that there might be too much violence or it might be too gory?

PATTINSON: Yeah, I have never really liked films that have kind of revelled in violence. I just think it’s kind of gross. I don’t know; I am just like, look how he cut his head off and things like the Saw movies and stuff like that. I thought the first one was pretty good, but sometimes I feel that you watch and it’s like, why are people liking this? I don’t want to see somebody being tortured. But it’s f**king weird. I don’t know, I guess you want to be scared or whatever. Maybe I am just a bit of a p*ssy. (laughs)

Q: Did you like the Australian landscape?

PATTINSON: Yeah, I loved it. It’s so strange and there’s nothing for miles and miles and it’s peaceful.

Q: Do you like loneliness and open spaces?

PATTINSON: Yeah, I like open spaces. And also incredible stars as well.

Q: Do you get to be alone as much as you want these days?

PATTINSON: Yeah. Well, yeah, but not like that, where it’s you are really alone. (laughter) Like, there’s no one.

Q: Thank you.

Source

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posted by Sep 17, 2014 • Filed in: Fan Submission, Internet/Bloggers, Movies, Reviews, The Rover

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Thanks @sallyvg for the tip!

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posted by Sep 17, 2014 • Filed in: Internet/Bloggers, Maps to the Stars, Movies, Press, Reviews

As always, it’s a challenge to fit in one’s “must-sees.” There are scheduling conflicts (like most festivals, TIFF has to deal with filmmakers who all want their pictures screened in the first weekend’s prime time spots), exacerbated by a lack of schedule options (most films only have two screenings in the first week now as opposed to the typical three or four that they had when I began attending). Occasional late starts (although not as many as last year) also complicated matters in terms of logistics, along with some computer snafus that left many ticketholders with seats to oversold screenings. Over 28 screenings had changes in venue, date, and/or time in the days before the festival opened, after selections had been made and tickets had been sold. Still, the TIFF staffers did their best to accommodate everyone. They always learn from their mistakes with the determination to put on a more trouble-free festival the following year.

In terms of film quality, though, TIFF lived up to expectations, as it always has in my nine years attending. There were about a dozen disappointments for me out of the 28 full-length features I attended — not necessarily bad, mind you, just that I had high hopes for them and they fell short. Several met or exceeded expectations. The rest, the ones which really made TIFF 2014 worth the trip, were pleasant surprises. So please keep in mind that even the “worst” ones on my schedule here could, theoretically, be among the best at other festivals, and would make my Top Picks from those respective fests. Just because you don’t see a title listed below doesn’t mean I didn’t love it — just that the list below is relative. .

I’ve narrowed the list down to my Top 10 using a 1-5 rating scale. Only one film deserved one star (avoid at all costs) and I gave two stars to four films (not recommended). Eight movies merited a three (I recommend it). There were five with a rating of four stars, ones I’d not only recommend but also would see again. That leaves the cream of the crop, which I’ve listed below. These are the 10 films that merited five stars — the ones I’d recommend, see again, and add to my home video collection.

Here is my Top 10 from the 2014 Toronto International Film Festival.

Big Game (Finland, Germany, UK)

Clouds of Sils Maria (France, USA)

Corbo (Canada)

Elephant Song (Canada)

The Humbling (USA)

Labyrinthus (Belgium)

Love & Mercy (USA)

Maps to the Stars (Canada, Germany)

Still Alice (USA)

Whiplash (USA)

HERE is the article written by Larry

Click HERE for more of Larry at the “Maps to the Stars” premiere at TIFF!

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posted by Sep 14, 2014 • Filed in: Fan Submission, Internet/Bloggers, Magazine, Movies, Photos, Press, Reviews, The Rover

Source (pages 28, 54, 55 and 83)

Thanks @lurker1510 for the tip and link!

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Thanks @lurker1510 for the share!

TO READ THE ARTICLE IN GERMAN AND IN ENGLISH, SEE UNDER THE CUT

Der Kanadier David Cronenberg hat zum ersten Mal in Hollywood gedreht – das Familien-Horrordrama “Maps To The Stars”. Darin zerbricht eine Familie an ihrem verbissenen Kampf um Erfolg und an einem dunklen Geheimnis. Von Dorothee Krings

Sie trägt lange schwarze Handschuhe über ihren Narben, weil das Feuer sie fast verzehrt hat. Dabei wollte Agatha die anderen aus der Welt brennen, den Vater, der als esoterischer Psycho-Motivator alternde Stars ausnimmt, und die Mutter, die nur Augen für den kleinen Bruder hatte, der als Kinderstar in Hollywood auch schon ein Vermögen verdient hat. Vielleicht trieb sie Eifersucht, vielleicht die Hellsichtigkeit eines Kindes, das in der Filmwelt aufwächst und die Verlogenheit, den Neid und die Ängste der Erwachsenen durchschaut. Jedenfalls ist Agatha ein Monster. Und sie ist zurück in L.A. – gekommen, um die Familie noch einmal zu besuchen.

Zum ersten Mal hat der kanadische Regisseur David Cronenberg in Hollywood gedreht. Und gleich macht er die Hauptstadt der Eitelkeit und des verbissenen Konkurrenzkampfes selbst zum Thema. “Maps To The Stars” ist eine biestige Satire auf die Scheinwelt Hollywoods, in der es um Aussehen und Beziehungen geht und hinter allem um Geld. Neu ist das freilich nicht. Auf dieser Flanke wurde Hollywood schon öfter attackiert. Cronenberg hat kein neues Thema, aber eine neue Methode: Genremixtur.

Der Film ist zugleich auch noch ein Familiendrama, ein Horrorthriller mit Splatter-Elementen und eine schwarze Romanze. Doch hat Cronenberg aus all den Genres kein Amalgam geschmolzen. Der Film kippt von einer Erzählweise in die nächste, hat bewusste Brüche. Als habe ein Drehbuchautor an seiner Geschichte herumdoktern müssen, um sie mit immer neuen Anreizen zu verkaufen. Man kann das als Kritik am System Hollywoods auf formaler Ebene werten. In jedem Fall schadet die erzählerische Merkwürdigkeit nicht, sie ist der eigentliche Reiz dieses seltsamen Films, in dem sich der Zuschauer nie zuhause, nie sicher fühlen kann. Eher wie ein Versuchskaninchen, das auf abenteuerliche Umschwünge in der Erzählhaltung reagieren muss.

Eigentlich ist die Handlung aber gar nicht wichtig. Cronenberg stellt eher ein Ensemble merkwürdiger Figuren zusammen, die der Zuschauer eine Weile beobachten darf. Allesamt sind sie überzeichnet, jedoch nicht auf vorhersehbare Art, man studiert sie also gern. Und sie werden von Schauspielern gespielt, die ihre Chance wittern und den Film phasenweise an sich reißen.

Allen voran Julianne Moore, die eine in die Jahre gekommene Diva spielt, die nicht nur mit dem eigenen Alter, dem Verblassen ihres Ruhms, dem Ausgemustertwerden hadert, sondern auch noch dem Vorbild der eigenen Mutter genügen will. Die war in den guten alten schwarz-weißen Tagen Hollywoods ein Star und soll nun in einem Biopic wieder auferstehen.

Natürlich will die Tochter die Rolle. Vor allem auch, weil es womöglich ihre letzte Chance ist, eine bedeutende Figur zu ergattern. Moore spielt diese Frau mit der aggressiven Egozentrik einer alternden Diva, verzweifelt selbstbewusst, unwirsch, launisch und hinter all dem unendlich verletzlich, weil ein Schauspieler nun mal nicht anders kann, als den Verlust einer Rolle, die Ablehnung seiner Kunst, persönlich zu nehmen.

Moore selbst hat diese Sorgen freilich nicht, sie bekam für diese Rolle bereits eine Palme in Cannes und darf für die Oscars zumindest hoffen.

Auch Mia Wasikowska, das blasse, auf spannende Art stets ein wenig in sich gekehrte Mädchen, macht aus der Rolle der Agatha ein sehenswertes Solo. Sie ist ein unscheinbarer Racheengel, ein Teufel in Gestalt des intelligenten Teenagers, ein beunruhigender Nerd. Weil sie als Kind Feuer legte und ihre Familie beinahe tötete, verbrachte sie ihre Jugend in einer Psychiatrie. Die Familie hat sie verstoßen, doch Agatha kehrt zurück an den Hollywood-Boulevard, um ein dunkles Familiengeheimnis zu lüften. Natürlich geht das nicht schmerzfrei.

John Cusack genießt seine Rolle als New-Age-Seelenmasseur, und auch Kinderstar Evan Bird spielt seine Rolle als arrogantes Schnöselkind mit sichtlicher Lust.

Am Ende drischt Cronenberg noch einmal herzhaft ein auf das heuchlerische Personal, das für Erfolg seine Seele verkauft. Gut möglich, dass er nicht nur Hollywood im Blick hatte.

Source

Translation by Laura with Reverso, please if used credit the website

The Canadian David Cronenberg has filmed for the first time in Hollywood – the family-horror drama ” Maps To The stars “. In it, a family breaks in their dogged battle for success and a dark secret.

She carries long black gloves on her scars because the fire has almost consumed her. Besides, Agatha wanted to burn the others from the world, the father who excluded her, getting older stars as an esoteric Psycho-Motivator, and the mother who had only eyes for her little brother who has already earned a status as a children’s star in Hollywood. Perhaps it is jealousy, perhaps the clairvoyance of a child who grows up in the world of cinema and sees through lying, envy and fears of the adults. Anyhow, Agatha is a monster. And she is back in L.A. – visiting the family one more time.

For the first time the Canadian director David Cronenberg has filmed in Hollywood. And immediately he shows the capital of vanity and the dogged competition there. ” Maps To The stars ” is a biestige satire on the dream world of Hollywood in which it is about appearance and relations and behind all around money. Of course this is not new. On this flank, Hollywood was attacked often. Cronenberg has no new subject, but a new method: genre mixture.

The film is at the same time a family drama, a horror thriller with splatter elements and a black romance. But Cronenberg has melted all genres with no amalgam. The film tips over from a narrative, and in the next has conscious breaks. As if a scriptwriter had had to tinker with its story to sell them with always new incentives. One can evaluate as a criticism of the system of Hollywood at formal level. In every case the narrative strangeness does not damage, it is the real attraction of this strange film in which the spectator can never feel at home, never certainly. Rather like a guinea pig who must react to complete adventurous changes in the narrative approach.

However, the business is not important at all. Cronenberg puts together an ensemble of peculiar figures which the spectator may observe for a while. All of them are oversubscribed, but not in foreseeable way, one studies them gladly. And they are played by actors who scent their chance and tear the film phase-wise in themselves.

What is enough for all is the main character by Julianne Moore who plays once the diva and who quarrels not only with her own age, her growing pale fame, to everyone’s eyes but also with the model of her own mother. She was a star during the good old black-and-white days of Hollywood and now should rise in a Biopic again.

Naturally the daughter wants the role. First of all because it is possibly her last chance to get a hold of an important role. This woman with the aggressive self-centredness of a getting an older diva is played by Moore, she despairs self-confidently, gruff to take the loss of a role, the refusal of its art, individually fickly and behind all infinitely vulnerable because an actor just cannot exist in a different way.

Moore does not have these concerns, of course, she already received for this role a palme d’or in Cannes and may at least hope for the Oscars.

A worth seeing solo comes from the role of Agatha played by Mia Wasikowska, the pale, in an exciting way, little girl who does not trust herself. She is an inconspicuous avenging angel, a devil in the form of an intelligent teenager, a worrying Nerd. Because she laid as a fire child and almost killed her family, she spent her youth in psychiatry. The family has expelled her, but Agatha turns back to Hollywood-Boulevard to air a dark family secret. Naturally it does not go painless.

John Cusack enjoys his role as a New Age-soul masseur, and also children’s star Evan Bird plays his role as an arrogant upstart child with obvious desire.

At the end Cronenberg threshes one more time heartily on the hypocritical staff which sells its soul for success. Good possibly that he had not only Hollywood in the look.

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